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For years, the carriers have rejected commitments related to the security of customers’ voice and data communications traversing their networks.  This entry focuses on how this position undermines the carriers’ interests in offering or partnering in the provision of data center and cloud computing services in which carriers must compete with established players or tech-savvy

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Rather than emulate the public cloud computing business models of Amazon or Google, IBM and AT&T have elected to bring their respective strengths together in an enterprise-focused cloud computer offering targeting Fortune 1000 customers, allocating responsibility for cloud infrastructure and computing to IBM and networking/transport to AT&T.

The companies’ are highlighting the enhanced security functions

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Achieving cost savings and efficiencies are a constant concern for IT/Telecom staffs.  While cloud computing (“one to many”)  is a relatively new option, more established IT outsourcing arrangements (“one to one”) continue to be offered by entities such as HP.  In evaluating the outsourcing option, one question that sometimes arises is whether Wireline services

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Amazon’s analysis of its extended cloud computing outage, as summarized in Richi Jennings IT Blogwatch, raises an important question for counsel advising clients negotiating agreements to procure cloud computing, content delivery and data communications services:  Should the agreement include a provision defining a service problem threshold and/or a series of problems threshold that triggers